Books You Should Read Before (or at) University

17 Books You Should Read Before (or at) University

Twenty university students from United State to Australia who were selected randomly were asked which books – fiction or non-fiction – would help them prepare for  transition to adulthood and university life. this is  a student-ranked  reading list for prospective and current university students.

(Descriptions and student reviews below)

  1.  Books You Should Read Before (or at) University

    (Descriptions and student reviews below)

    1. The Bible
    2. Sane New Worldby Ruby Wax
    3. The Opposite of Lonelinessby Marina Keegan
    4. Letters to a Law Studentby Nicholas J. McBride
    5. Fangirlby Rainbow Rowell
    6. Unbecomingby Jenny Downham
    7. I Am NOT Going to School Todayby Robie H. HarrisHow to Become a Straight-A Student by Cal Newport
    8. Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?by Michael Sandel
    9. The Art of Askingby Amanda Palmer
    10. The Defining Decadeby Meg Jay 
    11. Confessions of a Shopaholicby Sophie Kinsella
    12. Pictureby Lillian Ross
    13. The Marriage Plotby Jeffrey Eugenides
    14. A Brief History of Timeby Stephen Hawking
    15. Before You Leap–  a self-help ‘autobiographical’ book by Kermit the Frog 
    16. What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20by Teena Seelig
    17. How to Become a Straight-AStudent by Cal Newport

    Best universities for arts and humanities

    1. The Bible

    “The Bible – a living  manual . Experiencing diverse stories in the Old and the New Testament engages one to settle on better choices. Each and every thing and circumstance we see ourselves in becoming out of our folks’ home into autonomy is there: companions’ selling out (Judas Iscariot), family contempt (Joseph and his siblings who sold him into bondage; David and Abesalom), dread of the obscure (Jonah), enticement and sexual perversion (Judah and Tamar); assault (Amon and Tamar, who were sibling and sister). Be that as it may, at that point we likewise have the excellence of fellowship (David and Jonathan), the constancy of getting to be plainly incredible (Jacob), never-surrender soul (Job), joined families (Joseph and Mary) and, most importantly, intimate romance (the affection for Jesus towards humankind). In this way, everything and anything can be found in the Bible. Also, I’m unequivocally persuaded, regardless of your religion, that you’ll appreciate it. It’s amusing to peruse! Expressly, being a Christian has helped me a considerable measure through my college years to beat challenges (ie, family, companions, back, vocation objectives, connections). I actually owe God my life!”

    Recommended by Deborah Busari, studying for a master’s in economics of international business and finance at the University of Reading, UK. She is originally from Sofia, Bulgaria. 

     

     

     

    1. Sane New Worldby Ruby Wax

    “I’m not big on non-fiction, and I’d never read a self-help book until this one – and I finished it feeling like everyone should have this one their bookshelf. I read it all in one go, but it’s the perfect book to dip in and out of, when you feel like you need it. Going to university, and staying at university, is a really transformative time; and sometimes, we all need a helping hand. This book is really good at offering this in a very non-patronising way, talking about solutions as well as problems. Ruby Wax makes it clear that this book is not just for people who suffer with labelled mental health issues, be it anxiety or depression, but for everyone – because we’ve all felt stressed or isolated or scared, whether it’s about meeting new people, finishing your essay or getting used to a new city with new people. Read it before you go, and then take it with you. A little bit of mindfulness never did anyone any harm.”

    Recommended by Laura Warner, studying geography at University College London. 

    1. The Opposite of Lonelinessby Marina Keegan

    “I wish I would have perused this before setting out on the energizing voyage that is examining.” This gathering of individual expositions by a current Yale graduate, distributed after she kicked the bucket in an auto accident, turned into a success, inciting youngsters to consider what they truly need from life.

    Recommended by Felix Simon, who is studying for his BA in film and media studies and English studies at Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany. 

     

    1. Letters to a Law Studentby Nicholas J. McBride

    “In this book, the writer sets out the different stages in the profession way of a yearning legal advisor through noting the letters of a law understudy. The title of this book is to some degree deceiving as he answers bad-to-the-bone law inquiries as well as manages issues preceding the primary year at college and clarifies the progress from A level.

     

    “Much counsel is general thus helps trying college goers will’s identity non-law understudies. It’s an awesome book; it showed me authoritative abilities that are fundamental to being a free student and analyst, taking ‘autonomous’ to an unheard of level of self-inspiration.

     

    “The writer challenges autonomous considering, the peruser’s present critical thinking abilities and an eye for detail by not simply tossing an entire heap of hypothesis at him/her, however showing the difficulties through activities at the back of each letter. Reactions are uncovered toward the finish of the book with nitty gritty clarifications regarding why the appropriate response is X, not Y. It’s an engaging perused as the dialect is adjusted to a youthful grown-up peruser, and it leaves from generally favor vocabulary related with grown-up guidance.”

    Recommended by Noorin Malik, a law student at the University of Leeds, originally from Germany. 

    1. Fangirlby Rainbow Rowell

    “It’s one of the main Young Adult books that spreads college life rather than just earlier or soon after! It takes after family issues, tension and new kinships all through the storyteller’s first year, and it’s an extremely simple and fun read. It’s an extremely unique view on the common fiction about college being all drinking and new companions, yet is still extremely idealistic – an absolute necessity read for any individual who doesn’t feel like they fit the cliché uproarious, celebrating college shape!”

    Recommended by Katie Hodgkinson, a medical student at University College London. 

     

     

    1. Un becoming by Jenny Downham

    “It covers such a significant number of issues however isn’t an ‘issues’ book; sexuality, dementia, learning challenges and family issues are altogether secured delicately while woven into three wonderful stories from three ladies in three ages of one family. It gives the all encompassing perspective that such a large number of human services experts lose when they’re stalled in persistent measurements and science – that really, the logical answer may not really be the best contingent upon the identity and history of the individual being referred to.”

    Recommended by Katie Hodgkinson, a medical student at University College London. 

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    1. I Am NOT Going to School Todayby Robie H. Harris

    “I’m almost certain that my first day at college was far scarier than my first day of school. There was no shading, no stories, no recess and nobody made me a stuffed lunch. There was additionally nobody to influence me to go. We as a whole have recollections of telling our folks that, regardless, we were completely, by no means conceivably regularly going to class the following day – and after that, beyond any doubt enough, being packaged into the auto or on to the transport at 8am the following day. Nobody’s there influencing you to go to college, you can remain in bed in the event that you need to, and avoid the main day. This book advises us that the primary day is never as frightening as we think and that, on the second day, we’ll have companions, we’ll know where places are and what we have to do. It additionally advises us that on the off chance that you have to bring a toy monkey with you on your first day, that is OK.”

    Recommended by Laura Warner, studying geography at University College London. 

    1. Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?by Michael Sandel

    “As a sociology understudy, a book I would truly suggest is Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?by Michael Sandel. It gives an extremely all around organized, simple to-peruse prologue to basic considering and good issues, and there’s a ton of substance in my addresses that helps me to remember this book!”

    Recommended by Lu Allan, studying philosophy, politics and sociology at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

     

    1. How to Become a Straight-AStudent by Cal Newport

    “This book is an extremely clear manual for college life. It is brief and gives extraordinary, clear procedures for contemplating, planning for exams, arranging your arrangements and how to abstain from lingering. It does as such in an effectively lucid and interesting style. To put it plainly, the book offers a couple of basic yet viable methodologies to get your concentrate sorted out, with the goal that you can likewise make the most of your social life, rest and individual diversions without bounds degree conceivable in a full scholastic timetable.”

    Recommended by Melisande Riefler, studying at United World College in Germany. She has applied through Ucas for university in the UK. 

    1. The Marriage Plotby Jeffrey Eugenides

    “The Marriage Plot recounts the tale of three Brown University graduates, concentrating at first on their life at college and afterward on their life after. This novel gives a reviving differentiation to the commonplace sentimental consummation and gives the peruser a chance to encounter the battles and experiences of three youngsters endeavoring to wind up in a mind boggling world. Written in a grasping and excellent style, with clever and intense minutes, this is a really agreeable novel for perusers prior and then afterward college, the individuals who read a great deal and the individuals who read infrequently.”

    Recommended by Melisande Riefler, studying at United World College in Germany. She has applied through Ucas for university in the UK. 

    1. Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?by Michael Sandel

    “As a sociology student , a book I would really and  truly suggest is Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?by Michael Sandel. It gives an extremely all around organized, simple to-peruse prologue to basic considering and good issues, and there’s a great deal of substance in my addresses that helps me to remember this book!”Recommended by Lu Allan, studying philosophy, politics and sociology at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

    1. The Art of Askingby Amanda Palmer

    “We’re often too afraid to ask for help, because to ask for help is to feel like you’re being ‘weak’. So we bottle all of it inside and get stressed out. Amanda Palmer’s book is an honest and genuine reminder to all of us that sometimes, it’s OK to open up and throw yourself into the embrace of family and loved ones. It is a reminder that people care, and we should give ourselves the opportunity to be surprised when help comes from the most unexpected of places.”

    Recommended by Nicolette Tan, studying political science at the University of Pennsylvania in the United States. She is originally from Singapore. 

    1. The Defining Decadeby Meg Jay 

    “We are the ’30 is the new 20′ age, and we’re informed that we should investigate and commit every one of our errors in our twenties, and that it doesn’t make a difference. As a graduating senior, I can’t resist the opportunity to meet my ‘grown-up life’ with anxiety and dread. The Defining Decade draws from logical examinations done on 20-year-olds and in addition tales and stories from 20-year-olds, and assembles a gathering of data on how function, connections, identity, informal communities, character and even the mind can change more amid this decade than at some other time in adulthood – on the off chance that we utilize the time admirably. A fun, brilliant and productive read.”

    Recommended by Nicolette Tan, studying political science at the University of Pennsylvania in the United States. She is originally from Singapore. 

    1. Confessions of a Shopaholicby Sophie Kinsella

    “With college giving numerous chances to spend, spend, spend, Confessions of a Shopaholic by Sophie Kinsella is an ideal read for each fresher, male or female. The book concentrates on Becky Bloomwood, a budgetary writer whose thought of overseeing accounts is tossing Visa charges under the bed: out of the picture, therefore irrelevant, as the maxim goes. This pushes Becky into a universe of spiraling obligation, bank directors and miracle – something normal in our credit-fixated world. I adore this book, not on the grounds that it’s entertaining and to a great degree relatable, but rather on the grounds that it incorporates shrouded stories and implications behind the very much humored print. What on confront esteem shows up a comic take a gander at the shopaholic inclinations of ladies really dives profound into the embroidered artwork of our general public, and this is the reason I believe it’s a basic read before college.”

    Recommended by Olivia Firth, studying management at the University of York, UK. 

    1. A Brief History of Timeby Stephen Hawking

    “This self improvement guide truly enables college understudies to figure out how to deal with their chance shrewdly. An opportune production that is all around acclaimed.”

    Recommended by Tobias Jones, studying for a master’s in Middle Eastern studies at Leiden University, the Netherlands. He is originally from the UK.

     
    1. What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20by Teena Seelig

    The Official  executive of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, Teena Seelig, gives individual stories of individuals going past desires and testing the present state of affairs, including her own particular counsel about how to achieve your potential when you progress to another phase in life

    Recommended by Melisa Junata, a biomedical engineering student at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, originally from Indonesia.

     

    1. Before You Leap– a self-help ‘autobiographical’ book by Kermit the Frog

    “One book that is unquestionably a fun read is Before You Leap, a self improvement ‘personal’ book by Kermit the Frog. I got this book as a secondary school graduation blessing, and thus have talented it to companions for college graduations. Covering themes from sentiment, to subsiding into a profession and dealing with your funds, Kermit offers some fun and crisp guidance for anybody experiencing a transitional period in their lives. A hopeful viewpoint from the marsh, Kermit’s mind and intelligence is more significant than anticipated!”

    Recommended by Amanda Battistuzzi, studying for a bachelor of education at Laurentian University, Canada.

     

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